Category Archive Drew Group News

Wear helmets on quad bikes, pleads farm safety chief

An agriculture safety chief has urged farmers not to ignore simple life-saving advice to wear helmets when riding quad bikes.

Rick Brunt’s call comes after details of an horrific incident, when a teenager suffered a serious head wound, emerged in court proceedings.

The farm worker, aged 17, from Shap, Cumbria, was trapped underneath an overturned quad bike for an hour with a wound that later needed 17 stiches.

Carlisle Magistrates’ Court heard (on 20 June) that family partnership JF & M Bland had contracted the worker for general agricultural duties and he was instructed to use the firm’s quad bike to get to a large sloping field.

He did so, without any training, and with no helmet provided for him to wear. The vehicle overturned and it was an hour before one of the partners of the company found him.

After investigating the circumstances of the incident, which happened in April 2014, the Health and Safety Executive decided to prosecute JF & M Bland, of Dacre, Penrith, for breaches of health and safety laws.

The company pleaded guilty to breaching Regulation 9(1) of the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998. It was fined £6,000 and ordered to pay costs of £4,693.

Rick Brunt, head of agriculture at HSE, said: “Vehicle-related accidents are a significant problem in agriculture and one of the biggest killers. Only people who are trained and capable should operate all-terrain vehicles, like quad bikes. Every year, on average, we see two deaths and numerous injuries involving ATVs.”

HSE inspector Matthew Tinsley, who investigated and prosecuted for HSE, said: “This is a reminder to all farmers and farm workers that it just isn’t worth taking unnecessary risk. Training is vital, as is head protection. This is simple, common sense advice that, if followed, can save lives.”

For further information on ATV safety see http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/ais33.pdf

Notes to Editors: 

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. It aims to reduce work-related death, injury and ill health. It does so through research, information and advice, promoting training; new or revised regulations and codes of practice, and working with local authority partners by inspection, investigation and enforcement. www.hse.gov.uk
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/ 
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

Journalists should approach HSE press office with any queries on regional press releases.

HSE & HMRC joint webinar: Working with construction and with contractors – 5 July 2016

Find answers to typical questions about health and safety in construction as a commercial client and as a small contractor in this live webinar.

Webinar overview

As a business you may need to choose a contractor for building or repair work on your premises. Both you, as a commercial client, and the contractor, will have duties to make sure the work is carried out safely and without causing ill health or injury.

HSE and HMRC are working together to deliver a live webinar about the typical situations you are likely to face. The webinar consists of two presentations, the first from HSE and the second from HMRC which signpost the tools and guidance available to both clients and small contractors and includes a fictional case study to show how they work in practice. It looks at some of the questions you may have and guides you through the answers.

Some of the topics that will be included in the webinar:

  • Having construction work done safely
  • Doing construction work safely
  • Choosing a contractor
  • Fragile roof work

Who should attend?

  • Small commercial clients
  • Small building contractors
  • Safety reps
  • Those with an interest in health and safety

Webinar date

Once you have registered the webinar organizer will communicate with you regarding this event.

Suspended prison sentence for unregistered gas fitter

A gas fitter from Walsall has received a suspended prison sentence after he fitted a hob at a house in Tamworth when not on the Gas Safe Register.

Alan Nicholas Price’s work came to the attention of HSE after a registered fitter subsequently carried out repairs on the gas hob.

Price, 57, from Pelsall, was charged with breaching Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations. He failed to appear in court on two separate occasions and was arrested. At Stafford Crown Court, he pleaded guilty and was given a nine-month prison sentence, suspended for two years.

He was also ordered to complete 100 hours of community service and pay £100 towards HSE’s costs.

Gas Safe Register maintains the register of businesses and operatives who are competent to undertake gas work. Under the Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations, for a gas engineering business or operative to legally undertake gas work within the scope of the regulations, they must be on the Gas Safe Register.

Speaking after the hearing, HSE inspector Wayne Owen said: “When working on gas systems it is vital that the person has sufficient knowledge, training and experience so that they are aware of safe working practices and standards. This is due to the level of risk if gas systems are not worked on and fitted safely. The risk is posed not only to the person carrying out the work but to anyone else who may be in the vicinity of the systems afterwards; in this case the occupants of the house.”

Notes to Editors

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. It aims to reduce work-related death, injury and ill health. It does so through research, information and advice, promoting training; new or revised regulations and codes of practice, and working with local authority partners by inspection, investigation and enforcement. www.hse.gov.uk
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at:www.legislation.gov.uk link to external website
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

Journalists should approach HSE press office with any queries on regional press releases.

RR1040 – Rewriting MISHAP: The development of MISHAP12

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) uses the MISHAP01 (Model for the estimation of Individual and
Societal risk from HAzards of Pipelines) model to calculate the risks associated with Major Accident Hazard
(MAH) pipelines in Great Britain. The risks calculated are used to determine the distances to land-use
planning (LUP) zones around the MAH pipeline. MISHAP was originally developed in the 1990s using Visual
Basic 6 (VB6). An updated version, MISHAP01, was released in 2001. A Microsoft Excel® application, called
PipelineRiskAT was also developed to allow multiple MISHAP01 runs to be carried out concurrently. HSE
asked the Health and Safety Laboratory (HSL) to rewrite the model, using Microsoft Excel®, to bring the
code up-to-date and to allow easy implementation of improvements to the model. The initial specification
of the code rewrite was to replicate the results obtained from MISHAP01. HSE also asked that the
functionality of MISHAP01 and PipelineRiskAT be consolidated into a single software tool. The revised
model is called MISHAP12. HSL have tested the new code using a representative set of 584 pipelines.
The tests show that there is only a minimal impact on the final LUP zones generated compared to those
generated using the older models.

This report and the work it describes were funded by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). Its contents, including any opinions and/or conclusions expressed, are those of the authors alone and do not necessarily reflect HSE policy.

Assistance in the use of Adobe Acrobat PDF files is available on our FAQs page.

Worker suffers serious injury from contact with overhead power line

A stonemasonry company in Perth has been fined after an apprentice stonemason was seriously injured from contact with an overhead power line.

Perth Sheriff Court heard how 20 year old apprentice Rodd McFarlane was working for T& M Stonemasonry, carrying out repairs at Waulkmill Cottage in Perth.

During this work, McFarlane erected a tower scaffold to carry out some re-pointing work.

While on the scaffold he came into contact with overhead 240volt electricity power lines that were supplying the cottage. The wind caused the power line to brush against his back causing him to turn around instinctively and grab the live wire. The flow of the current meant he was unable to let go for a few seconds until he jumped down from the board on the tower scaffold. His weight broke the wire and interrupted the flow of current.

He received an electric shock and suffered burns to both hands requiring graft surgery and a possible future amputation of a little finger.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) into the incident which occurred on 2 August 2012 found that the stone masonry company should have developed a safe system of work.

T&M Stonemasonry, of Highfield Road, Scone, Perth, pleaded guilty to breaching Section 2(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974, and was fined £16,000.

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. It aims to reduce work-related death, injury and ill health. It does so through research, information and advice, promoting training; new or revised regulations and codes of practice, and working with local authority partners by inspection, investigation and enforcement. www.hse.gov.uk 
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/  
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

Journalists should approach HSE press office with any queries on regional press releases.

Worker contracts allergic contact dermatitis

A company based in Hereford which manufactures rubber sealants has been fined after a worker contracted allergic contact dermatitis.

Hereford Magistrates’ Court heard how an employee contracted the skin disease after being exposed to sensitising ingredients in rubber compounds.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that the company failed to assess risks from products used or manage those risks.

The company’s health and safety advisor failed to understand the underlying issues to the level required for the company to understand its responsibilities.

TRP Polymer Solutions Limited, of Netherwood Road, Rotherwas Industrial Estate, Hereford, pleaded guilty to breaching Section 2 of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974, and Regulations 6 and 11 of the Control of Substances hazardous to Health 2002 (COSHH), and was fined £40,000 and ordered to pay costs of £6,529.

Paula Underwood, a self-employed health and safety advisor, of Slaughter Castle, Kimbolton, Leominster, Herefordshire, pleaded guilty to breaching Section 3(2) of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974, for failing to carry out her duty under the act to a level of competence expected by someone carrying out her role, thereby exposing others to risks to their health and safety, was fined £1,000 and ordered to pay costs of £200.

For further information on COSHH visit: http://www.hse.gov.uk/toolbox/harmful/coshh.htm

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. It aims to reduce work-related death, injury and ill health. It does so through research, information and advice, promoting training; new or revised regulations and codes of practice, and working with local authority partners by inspection, investigation and enforcement. www.hse.gov.uk
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

Journalists should approach HSE press office with any queries on regional press releases.